Crocker-West Applied Research Laboratory

Location:

State College, PA
 

Hollow Core Plank Precaster:

 

Owner:

C2S L.P., State College, PA
 

Architect:

Scott Smith, building designer and principal at Civilsmith Engineering, Inc., State College, PA
 

Engineer:

Evanko-Renwick Engineering, State College, PA
 

Contractor:

Sponaugle Construction Services, State College, PA
 

Project Scope

Sq. Footage:

123,000
 

Levels/Floors:

3
 

Structural Precast Elements:

• 1,200 precast pieces including columns, beams, shear walls, stairs with landings, slabs, interior and insulated exterior wall panels, and hollowcore plank.
• underground precast cistern (130-foot-long, 12x12-foot).
 

Finishes

Stone:

Precast panels emulating the look of limestone
 

Brick:

Precast panels containing thin brick accents
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Crocker-West Applied Research Laboratory
Crocker-West Applied Research Laboratory
Crocker-West Applied Research Laboratory
Crocker-West Applied Research Laboratory
Crocker-West Applied Research Laboratory
Crocker-West Applied Research Laboratory
Crocker-West Applied Research Laboratory
Crocker-West Applied Research Laboratory
Crocker-West Applied Research Laboratory
Crocker-West Applied Research Laboratory
Crocker-West Applied Research Laboratory
Crocker-West Applied Research Laboratory
Crocker-West Applied Research Laboratory
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Penn State’s new Applied Research Laboratory building, a 121,000-square-foot, $16.5-million project, features a total-precast concrete structure to create an efficiently constructed design that saved significant construction time.

Structural Frame Erected In 8-1/2 Weeks
The use of precast concrete components allowed the Crocker-West facility to be constructed in five segments, so various trades could work concurrently on different sections once work progressed. In all, the building was constructed in five phases, in three-story increments. The buildings structural frame took only 8-1/2 weeks to erect. After only four weeks, some portions were ready to be roofed, leading to the installation of windows and mechanical details.

Using welded connections rather than grouted ones sped up construction further, as it eliminated the need to heat grout. Subcontractors saved more time by having a variety of amenities, including light fixtures, conduit and HVAC openings cast into the panels. The project was completed five weeks ahead of schedule.

The precast panels, which offer an Insulation value of R-28, serve four functions: exterior façade treatment, structural wall floor support, fireproofing, and insulation. The repetition in casting the forms allowed the designers to incorporate ornate pieces at an economical price that helped lower costs for the project. About 1,200 pieces were fabricated, with many of them cast on a single 30-foot module.

Dyed architectural precast was used on exposed interior columns, which were sandblasted to provide texture. The dying process eliminated the need for fireproofing on columns, saving more time and cost. Other pieces feature a liner that resembles limestone or embedded thin-brick accents.

The precast concrete components also are helping the project achieve its goal of a LEED Gold rating. These include its energy efficiency, waste management, use of recycled materials, and other benefits. The rating also is aided by an underground precast concrete cistern that captures runoff water.

For more information on this project, visit www.bdcnetwork.com/article/precast-all-way.

 
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